Appellate

  • February 26, 2024

    Estate Correctly Taxed On Insurance Payout, Justices Told

    The U.S. Supreme Court should affirm a decision denying a tax refund to the estate of an owner of a building materials company that used a payout from his $3.5 million life insurance policy to purchase his shares in the business, the federal government argued.

  • February 26, 2024

    Teamsters Tells 7th Circ. Sysco Must Arbitrate Benefits Spat

    A Sysco distribution center in Indianapolis must arbitrate its dispute with a Teamsters local over workers' entitlement to early retirement benefits, the union told the Seventh Circuit, arguing the applicable collective bargaining agreement includes a broad arbitration clause.

  • February 26, 2024

    Black Truck Drivers Can't Revive Race Bias Suit At 3rd Circ.

    Two Black truck drivers for a supermarket chain couldn't beat "voluminous evidence" that they were fired for threatening a co-worker who one called a "rat" or a "snitch," the Third Circuit ruled, refusing to revive their suit blaming race bias for their termination.

  • February 26, 2024

    BP, Chevron Lose 4th Circ. Fight Over Climate Suit Venue

    The Fourth Circuit on Monday rejected the latest attempt by BP, Chevron, Exxonmobil and other oil titans to go to federal court to litigate complaints that accuse them of lying about fossil fuels' climate effects, joining multiple courts in reasoning that the claims don't invoke federal law.

  • February 26, 2024

    High Court Won't Hear Calif. Honking Ban Appeal

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday opted not to take up an appeal challenging a California law banning people from honking car horns except to warn others, leaving the ban in place.

  • February 26, 2024

    1st Circ. Rejects Crypto Founder's Hollow Fraud Appeal

    A cryptocurrency founder convicted of fraud hitched his appeal to "inapplicable precedent" and failed to muster an argument why a judge's blocking of testimony from government witnesses deprived his defense of material and favorable evidence, the First Circuit said in upholding the guilty verdict.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Decline Standard Chartered Sanction Evasion Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to consider whether a whistleblower should've been granted a hearing in a lower court to support allegations that Standard Chartered Bank cleared roughly $56 billion in violation of U.S. sanctions against Iran.

  • February 26, 2024

    High Court Skips Black School Administrator's Retaliation Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to review a suit from a Black school administrator who claimed she was denied a promotion for opposing racial desegregation plans, leaving in place a split Eighth Circuit decision that found federal employment bias law didn't protect her.

  • February 26, 2024

    Trump Calls Biz Bans 'Punitive' In $465M Civil Fraud Appeal

    Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and former officers moved to appeal the $464.6 million civil fraud judgment handed down by a New York state judge earlier this month, accusing the judge of overstepping his authority and issuing "punitive" relief.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Push To Unseal IBM Age Bias Award

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to review a Second Circuit decision barring a former IBM employee from publicizing her arbitration win on age bias claims, despite her assertion that the appeals court improperly valued confidentiality over public access to court documents.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Tribes Can Argue Separately In Healthcare Row

    Two Native American tribes seeking to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse them millions of dollars in administrative healthcare costs can argue their cases separately, the U.S. Supreme Court said Monday.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Pass On Venue Fight In Erie Indemnity Fees Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review the Third Circuit's refusal to transfer a case challenging Erie Indemnity Co. management fees from state court back to federal court, preserving the lower court's precedential ruling that the matter does not qualify as a class action under the Class Action Fairness Act.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    Lifetime Beats Order That Blocked Airing Wendy Williams Doc

    A New York state appellate court on Friday gave Lifetime the green light to air its docuseries on talk show host Wendy Williams, finding that a temporary restraining order that would have blocked the series' Feb. 24 premiere was a violation of the First Amendment.

  • February 23, 2024

    Netflix, Hulu Don't Owe Franchise Fees, Calif. Panel Rules

    Netflix and Hulu have again beaten a proposed class action from a California city claiming the streaming providers should be regulated like cable companies and pay franchise fees to localities, with a state appeals court ruling the city had no right to private action under a 2006 statute.

  • February 23, 2024

    Miss. High Court Won't Axe Liver Failure Wrongful Death Suit

    The Mississippi Supreme Court reinstated wrongful death claims brought by the widow of a driver who suffered injuries in an auto crash but died due to liver failure after being prescribed acetaminophen, finding that the question of whether his death was foreseeable is one for the jury to decide.

  • February 23, 2024

    Yes, Justices Mainly Use Arguments To Talk To Each Other

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor confirmed Friday a common complaint from attorneys who've argued in front of her and her eight colleagues: The justices are most definitely using their questions at oral arguments to talk to each other, not the lawyers.

  • February 23, 2024

    Restaurants Blast 'Fatal Flaws' In Chicken Price-Fix Deal

    Boston Market and other restaurants objecting to Simmons Foods' $8 million chicken price-fixing settlement with direct purchasers say the Seventh Circuit should unwind the deal because it improperly releases bid-rigging claims for no consideration and turns the massive two-track case on its head.

  • February 23, 2024

    Gov.'s Romantic Ties To Top Court Pick May Spark Recusals

    Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey's selection of a former romantic partner to serve on the state's Supreme Judicial Court could be grounds for the justice to recuse herself from certain cases, though those scenarios would be relatively rare, legal ethics experts told Law360.

  • February 23, 2024

    DC Appeals Panel Receptive To Ex-DOJ Atty's Subpoena Fight

    A D.C. Court of Appeals panel on Friday appeared open to former U.S. Department of Justice attorney Jeffrey Clark's request that the court reconsider enforcing a subpoena from the D.C. bar's disciplinary counsel pursuing ethics charges against Clark for his alleged role in promoting Donald Trump's false election fraud narrative.

  • February 23, 2024

    MV Realty Asks NC Justices To Stay Injunction Pending Appeal

    MV Realty is defending the enforceability of a series of agreements with more than 2,000 North Carolina homeowners — asking the state's Supreme Court to overturn a trial judge's injunction finding the company likely couldn't beat claims that the deals were truly predatory, high-interest loans.

  • February 23, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Rethink Adviser's Defamation Coverage Denial

    A Fourth Circuit panel declined to reconsider its decision that an investment adviser is not owed coverage under her firm's professional liability policy for an underlying defamation lawsuit.

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Asylum Rightly Denied Over UK Assault Record

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday ruled that a noncitizen was ineligible for asylum, finding reliable the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's evidence that he had sexually assaulted minors while living in the United Kingdom.

  • February 23, 2024

    Idaho Blasts 'Abortion Mandate' In High Court State Ban Fight

    The Idaho attorney general has accused the federal government of transforming an emergency medical care law into an "abortion mandate" in a U.S. Supreme Court case pitting the state's criminal ban against the Biden administration's efforts to maintain abortion access post-Dobbs.

  • February 23, 2024

    8th Circ. Says Nursing Home Fraudster Owes Supplier $7.6M

    A nursing home company whose owner pled guilty in January to employment tax fraud in a New Jersey federal case must shoulder a $5 million judgment plus interest and fees for bills it failed to pay a medical supply company, an Eighth Circuit panel affirmed Friday.

Expert Analysis

  • Setting The Stage For High Court BofA Escrow Interest Case

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    Dori Bailey and Curtis Johnson at Bond Schoeneck examine relevant legislation and case law dating back 200 years ahead of oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Cantero v. Bank of America, the outcome of which will determine whether state laws governing mortgage escrow accounts can be enforced against national banks.

  • High Court Forfeiture Case Again Pits Text Against Purpose

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    In oral arguments Tuesday in McIntosh v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a federal court can impose asset forfeiture on a defendant even if it doesn’t comply with timing rules, which may affect the broader interpretation of procedural deadlines — and tees up the latest battle between textualism and purposivism, say Anden Chow and Christian Bale at MoloLamken.

  • Using Arbitration And Class Waivers As Privacy Suit Tools

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    Amid a surge in data breach class actions over the last few years, several federal court decisions indicate that arbitration clauses and class action waiver provisions can be possible alternatives to public court battles and potentially reduce the costs of privacy litigation, say Mark Olthoff and Courtney Klaus at Polsinelli.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Justices Stay The Course In Maritime Choice-Of-Law Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's narrowly drawn decision in Great Lakes Insurance v. Raiders Retreat Realty, enforcing the underlying insurance contract's choice-of-law provision, carefully distinguishes those provisions from forum selection clauses, and ensures that courts will not apply its precepts outside the maritime context, says John Coyle at the University of North Carolina.

  • More Than Drugs At Stake In High Court's 'Blind Mule' Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's eventual decision in Diaz v. U.S., evaluating whether expert witnesses may testify that most defendants caught with drugs at the border know they are transporting drugs, could have implications for prosecuting everything from complex financial crimes to gun and drug cases, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Why Fla. High Court Adopting Apex Doctrine Is Monumental

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    The Florida Supreme Court recently solidified the apex doctrine in the Sunshine State, an important development that extends the scope of the doctrine in the state to include both corporate and government officials, and formalizes the requirements for a high-level corporate official to challenge a request for a deposition, says Laura Renstrom at Holland & Knight.

  • Why Biz Groups Disagree On Ending Chevron Deference

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    Two amicus briefs filed in advance of last month's U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo highlight contrasting views on whether the doctrine of Chevron deference promotes or undermines the stable regulatory environment that businesses require, say Wyatt Kendall and Sydney Brogden at Morris Manning.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • Google Patent Case Is A Claim Construction Litigation Lesson

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    The Federal Circuit's recent precedential decision in Google v. EcoFactor, which held that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board erred in the claim construction it had unknowingly adopted, shows that litigators should be alert to claim construction issues that masquerade as something else, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • NY's Revamped Card Surcharge Ban Is Unique Among States

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    Newly revised New York legislation bolsters the state's ban on credit card surcharges, potentially reinvigorating similar laws across the country despite the fact that many of them have been ruled unconstitutional, say Tom Witherspoon and Audrey Carroll at Stinson.

  • How VA Court Change Is Affecting Insurance Disputes

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    The expansion of the Virginia Court of Appeals' jurisdiction to include review of decisions involving insurance coverage stands to significantly grow the body of related case law, likely to the benefit of policyholders, as evident in the recent decision in Bowman II v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Co., say Michael Levine and Olivia Bushman at Hunton.

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify When Gov't Clawback Is Timely

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    The Federal Circuit’s examination of claims accrual in a January decision that allows the Defense Contract Management Agency to pursue overpayment claims under a cost-reimbursement contract serves as a reminder that the government can lose such claims by waiting too long to file, say Evan Sherwood and Peter Hutt at Covington.

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