Health

  • May 07, 2024

    Yale Can View Deposition In Fraudulent Insemination Suit

    Entities tied to Yale University can see a transcript of a deposition taken from a retired fertility doctor accused in two court actions of secretly using his own sperm for inseminations in the 1980s, as the school tries to shield itself from possible litigation, a Connecticut judge ruled Tuesday.

  • May 07, 2024

    Birth Control Cos. Can't Dodge Conn. Injury Suit, Court Told

    An Illinois woman who sued after her Filshie Clip birth control device migrated inside of her and "wreaked havoc on her body" has urged a state court not to let the manufacturers of the device and the seller's parent companies dodge her claims.

  • May 06, 2024

    Hospital Hits Back At Kowalskis' Bid For Sanctions

    Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital urged a Florida court on Friday to reject a sanctions bid by the attorneys for Maya Kowalski — who won a $213 million verdict against the hospital and was the subject of the Netflix documentary "Take Care of Maya" — against the hospital's attorneys, arguing that the request for the court to refer them to the Florida Bar is improper.

  • May 06, 2024

    Judge Trims ESOP Valuation Suit Against Healthcare Co.

    A California federal judge has trimmed a lawsuit against KPC Healthcare Inc., its employee stock ownership plan committee and its investment manager Alerus Financial alleging that a sale of company stock was mismanaged.

  • May 06, 2024

    Monsanto Says Ruling Undoes $438M School PCB Loss

    Monsanto said Friday that a $438 million judgment in a polychlorinated biphenyls poisoning case at a Washington school should be thrown out, citing a recent state appellate court ruling undoing a $185 million jury verdict in a similar case involving chemical-caused illnesses at the same school campus.

  • May 06, 2024

    Chickasaw Can't Reopen Optum Prescription Payback Suit

    An Oklahoma federal judge has denied a bid by the Chickasaw Nation to reopen its lawsuit over prescription reimbursement claims, ruling that the tribe has not met its burden of showing that provider UnitedHealth Group's Optum waived its right to arbitration.

  • May 06, 2024

    UChicago Can't Ditch Data Sharing Privacy Claim

    A University of Chicago Medical Center patient accusing the hospital of illegally sharing her and other patients' identifying information with Meta can pursue her claims that the info sharing constitutes a federal wiretap violation, an Illinois federal judge said.

  • May 06, 2024

    Paul Weiss Lands M&A Pro Who Sees Strong Deals Pipeline

    James "Jim" Langston has joined Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP as a partner in its mergers and acquisitions practice in New York, telling Law360 the move presented an irresistible opportunity to team up with attorneys he previously admired from across the bargaining table. 

  • May 06, 2024

    Mass General Eyes Retirement Plan Fee Suit Settlement

    The Mass General healthcare system in Boston and a proposed class of its workers are in the process of negotiating an agreement to resolve the employees' claims that they were charged excessive administrative fees for their retirement plan, the parties told a Massachusetts federal court.

  • May 06, 2024

    Latham & Watkins, Simpson Thacher Steer Healthcare JV

    Healthcare Realty Trust Inc. and KKR announced on Monday that the two have entered a joint venture to own and invest in quality medical outpatient buildings, in a deal guided by Latham & Watkins LLP and Simpson Thacher & Barlett LLP.

  • May 06, 2024

    Calif. Doctors Can't Escape Med Mal Atty's Defamation Suit

    A California appeals court has said two California doctors cannot escape a defamation suit over an allegedly defamatory website they created about a malpractice attorney whom they'd had a fee dispute with, denying an anti-SLAPP motion because the language the lawyer identified in his amended complaint was not protected activity.

  • May 06, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A record $100 million settlement, a fishy Facebook decision, a canceled Amazon delivery and an upended $7.3 billion sale dispute topped the news out of Delaware's Court of Chancery last week. There were also new cases involving Hess, Microsoft and the 2022 World Cup.

  • May 06, 2024

    Hospital Chain Steward Health Hits Ch. 11 With Over $1B Debt

    Embattled hospital operator Steward Health Care filed for Chapter 11 protection Monday in a Texas bankruptcy court with more than $1 billion in debt, blaming rising costs and falling government reimbursement rates.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ala. High Court Won't Rethink Decision On Frozen Embryos

    The Alabama Supreme Court on Friday refused to revisit its February decision finding that frozen embryos count as children, a first-of-its-kind decision that has been received as potentially ruinous for in vitro fertilization services in the Yellowhammer State.

  • May 03, 2024

    BVI Co. Looks To Force $195M PPE Fight Into Arbitration

    A British Virgin Islands company facing a jury trial next year in a $195 million lawsuit over a purchasing deal for personal protective equipment urged a Missouri federal judge Friday to send the dispute to arbitration in Oklahoma instead.

  • May 03, 2024

    Hospital In Novant Merger Beset By Staff Turnover, Court Told

    The Federal Trade Commission and two healthcare companies used witness testimony Friday to paint competing pictures of a North Carolina hospital at the center of a $320 million merger dispute: one in which the hospital has focused on making quality improvements, and another where it's been plagued by poor ratings and high staff turnover.

  • May 03, 2024

    NJ Court Again Affirms Dismissal Of Suit Over Infant's Death

    A New Jersey appeals court on Friday denied a bid from a couple to reinstate their malpractice suit over the death of their 6-month-old son, saying they failed to show they had substantially complied with the statute of limitations.

  • May 03, 2024

    Arby's Franchise, Auto Dealer Hit With Ga. Data Breach Suits

    Workers at an Arby's franchise, a home nursing company and national car dealership have sued their employers in Georgia federal court, alleging the employers failed to safeguard sensitive personal information exposed in recent cyberattacks.

  • May 03, 2024

    How Big IP Judgment Winners Are Insuring 'Nuclear Verdicts'

    Until a few years ago, intellectual property plaintiffs who scored large monetary awards — often referred to as "nuclear verdicts" — had to wait out a lengthy appellate process before knowing how much money they would end up with. But a relatively new type of insurance policy is allowing plaintiffs to insure part of their judgment in case it gets reduced or wiped out on appeal. 

  • May 03, 2024

    Colo. Justices' Med Mal Cap Ruling A Win For Patients

    The Colorado Supreme Court's recent decision prohibiting trial courts from considering an injured patient's insurance liabilities before imposing the state's $1 million medical malpractice damages cap was the right call, experts say, and prevents an unfair windfall for negligent health care providers.

  • May 03, 2024

    Aetna To Pay $2M To End LGBTQ Fertility Coverage Suit

    A group of Aetna policyholders said Friday that the insurance giant has agreed to pay $2 million and revise certain health insurance guidelines to settle a proposed class action alleging its definition of infertility made it difficult and expensive for LGBTQ couples to obtain coverage for fertility treatments.

  • May 03, 2024

    Law Firm Pans Photographer's IP Suit Over Website Image

    The Schmidt Firm asked a Texas federal judge Friday to ax a professional photographer's allegations the Dallas-based firm illegally posted his copyrighted image of convicted sexual abuser and ex-Columbia University obstetrician-gynecologist Robert Hadden on its website without permission.

  • May 03, 2024

    Publix Can't Send Questions To Ga. Justices In Opioid Suit

    A federal judge overseeing national opioid litigation has rejected Publix's bid to ask the Georgia Supreme Court "convoluted and confusing" questions about if the state's public nuisance law applied to allegations the supermarket chain overdistributed painkillers.

  • May 03, 2024

    Medical Testing Co. Not In Health Field For Taxes, IRS Says

    A company that fills medical testing orders for its customers is nonetheless not a business involved in performing services in the health field for certain tax purposes, the Internal Revenue Service said in a private letter ruling released Friday.

  • May 03, 2024

    Conn. Dentists Settle Govt's Illegal Patient Recruiting Suit

    Two Connecticut dental practices and their co-owners have settled a federal false claims lawsuit accusing them of making illegal payments to a patient recruiter to generate business through Medicaid, agreeing to fork over about $187,000 over five years, plus 4% interest.

Expert Analysis

  • Lessons For Nursing Facilities From DOJ Fraud Settlement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent settlement with the owner of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities in Florida provides a cautionary tale of potential fraud risks, and lessons on how facilities can mitigate government enforcement actions, say Callan Stein and Rebecca Younker at Troutman Pepper.

  • Planning For Healthcare-Private Equity Antitrust Enforcement

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    U.S. antitrust agency developments could mean potential enforcement actions on healthcare-related acquisitions by private equity funds are on the way, and entities operating in this space should follow a series of practice tips, including early assessment of antitrust risks on both the state and federal level, say Ryan Quillian and John Kendrick at Covington.

  • 3 Health Insurance Paths For Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy

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    Ahead of potential U.S. Food and Drug Administration approvals for psychedelics as insured treatments, attorneys at Husch Blackwell review pathways for these drugs to achieve coverage as treatments for complex mental health conditions.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonprecedential, Unreasonable, Scope

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    James Tucker at MoFo examines three recent decisions showing that while the results of past competitions may inform bid strategy, they are not determinative; that an agency's award may be deemed unreasonable if it ignores available information; and that a protester may be right about an awardee's noncompliance but still lose.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Direct Claims Ruling May Alter Gov't Ties To Software Firms

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    A recent Federal Circuit decision allowing a software developer to pursue legal action under the Contract Disputes Act could change the government's relationship with commercial software providers by permitting direct claims, even in third-party purchase situations, say Dan Ramish and Zach Prince at Haynes Boone.

  • AI In Accounting Raises OT Exemption Questions

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    A recent surge in the use of artificial intelligence in accounting work calls into question whether professionals in the industry can argue they are no longer overtime exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, highlighting how technology could test the limits of the law for a variety of professions, say Bradford Kelley at Littler and Stephen Malone at Peloton Interactive.

  • What To Know About State-Level Health Data Privacy Laws

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    Companies that handle consumer health data, including those in the retail sector, should take a conservative approach when interpreting the scope of new health privacy laws in Washington, Nevada and Connecticut, which may include development of privacy notices, consent procedures, rights request response processes and processor contracts, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Opinion

    Intoxicating Hemp Products: It's High Time For Clarity

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    Thanks to ambiguity in the 2018 Farm Bill, intoxicating hemp cannabinoid products are largely unregulated and are widely available without restrictions on who can buy the products, and although there are several possible solutions, voluntary industry action by good actors is the best option, say Andrew Kline and Tommy Tobin at Perkins Coie.

  • HHS' Updated Tracking Tech Guidance Offers Little Clarity

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    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Civil Rights' updated guidance on the use of online tracking technologies appears more focused on legal issues raised in ongoing litigation with the American Hospital Association and less on practical guidance for covered entities, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • What Rescheduling Could Mean For Cannabis Bankruptcies

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    Bankruptcy courts have historically been closed for cannabis-related businesses, but recent case law coupled with a possible reclassification of cannabis provides cautious optimism, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • Opinion

    Pharmacies Need More Protection Against PBM Fee Practices

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    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' recent reform regarding direct and indirect remuneration fees will mitigate the detrimental effects that pharmacy benefit manager policies have on struggling pharmacies, but more is needed to prevent PBMs from exploiting loopholes, says Bhavesh Desai at Mazina Law.

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