Intellectual Property

  • February 26, 2024

    Temu Accuses Shein Of Scaring Suppliers Away

    Temu has accused Shein of trying to subvert its operations through anti-competitive behaviors, claiming that its ultra-fast fashion rival has cornered suppliers and inundated it with "baseless notices" to disrupt U.K. sales.

  • February 23, 2024

    'Copy-And-Paste Errors' Not Worth Sanctions, Texas Judge Says

    A federal magistrate judge in Waco, Texas, says he doesn't think "some copy-and-paste errors" are enough to hook a prolific litigator of patent lawsuits to paying legal fees in a shell company's latest failed campaign against Salesforce.

  • February 23, 2024

    A Comma Causes Netflix's Patent Challenge To Flop

    The majority of a board of patent judges has refused to budge on a determination upholding a streaming media patent challenged by Netflix, though the judges on the panel splintered at length on the grammatical implications of how to correctly read a comma.

  • February 23, 2024

    Dish, IFit Settle Patent Suit Over Streaming Tech

    Fitness equipment maker NordicTrack's parent company has settled a dispute with Dish Network that accused it of infringing Dish patents related to streaming technology, drawing to a close a fight that spread all the way to the U.S. International Trade Commission.

  • February 23, 2024

    Clothier Seeks To Ditch IP Suit Over Upcycled Designer Goods

    A Houston-based apparel company has asked a Texas federal judge to toss a suit brought against it by Louis Vuitton Malletier SAS, saying Thursday that the luxury designer waited too long to file suit alleging the clothing business infringed its trademark by selling upcycled items made with materials from used Louis Vuitton products.

  • February 23, 2024

    Chamber's Report Bemoans Biden's March-In Idea For Drug IP

    The most powerful business lobbying group in the U.S. said that although the country ranked at the top of its annual International IP Index, the Biden administration's efforts to potentially use patent laws to reduce the price of pharmaceuticals would jeopardize its place down the line.

  • February 23, 2024

    Telecom Giants Can't End Decadelong 4G LTE Patent Row

    A group of prominent telecommunications companies has failed to escape a patent dispute dating back a decade with the University of Minnesota concerning wireless communications technology used in 4G LTE network services.

  • February 23, 2024

    Media, App Groups Wary Of Allowing Data Mining, AI Hacking

    Publishers and entertainment industry groups have urged the government to reject proposed exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that would broaden protections for text-and-data mining and allow hackers to study biases in artificial intelligence models, raising concerns about infringement and cybersecurity.

  • February 23, 2024

    Monster Energy Ends Trade Dress Suit Against Beast Cookie

    Monster Energy dropped its trademark and trade dress infringement action alleging Beast Cookie used confusingly similar branding to advertise its caffeinated cookies, including a green color scheme and the phrase "untamed energy," according to an order signed by a California federal judge granting the parties' stipulation to end their dispute.

  • February 23, 2024

    J&J Unit Assails Knee Replacement IP Verdict At Fed. Circ.

    Johnson & Johnson subsidiary DePuy Synthes wants the Federal Circuit to undo a $20 million jury verdict against it for infringing an orthopedic surgeon's knee replacement patent.

  • February 23, 2024

    IP Hires: DLA Piper, Troutman Pepper

    DLA Piper has hired a longtime Nixon Peabody LLP fashion law partner who focuses her practice on intellectual property issues related to apparel and other industries, while Troutman Pepper Hamilton Sanders LLP has expanded its health sciences services in the Philadelphia region with a patent practitioner who joined the firm after more than 20 years with GlaxoSmithKline. Here are the details on these and other notable IP hires.

  • February 23, 2024

    Dickinson Wright Pulls In IP Atty From Steptoe

    Dickinson Wright PLLC continues to expand its intellectual property team, adding a new member to its Chicago office from Steptoe LLP.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Dechert Atty Can Keep Depo Confidential In Hacking Case

    A former Dechert LLP partner can keep her deposition under wraps in an airline mogul's suit seeking to prove an international hacking conspiracy, a special master in North Carolina has ruled in a blow to the tycoon, who accused the attorney of trying to shield misconduct.

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Rethink Tossed Google $2B Ad Trespass Suit

    The Ninth Circuit said Thursday that it will not reconsider its decision to toss a proposed $2 billion class action against Google that claimed the ubiquitous search engine enriched itself through unauthorized advertising that trampled website owners' property.

  • February 23, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen Tesco target competing retailer Lidl with a copyright claim as they battle in the Court of Appeal over the design of Tesco’s Clubcard, the directors of a taxi business sue the creator of an AI route mapping app for professional negligence, Global Aerospace Underwriting Managers tackle an aviation claim by an Irish investment company, and Robert Bull hit with a general commercial contracts claim by Hancock Finance.

  • February 22, 2024

    Mastercard Faces Monopolization Claims Over Digital Tokens

    Mastercard has been stonewalling digital wallet startup OV Loop, refusing to provide needed tokens and thereby excluding OV Loop from the mobile payment services market, all part of Mastercard's effort to maintain its chokehold on payment processing and continue to charge supracompetitive fees on transactions, according to a suit filed Wednesday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Great Scott! NBCUniversal Can't Beat DeLorean TM Claim

    NBCUniversal Media cannot escape a trademark infringement claim in a dispute over royalty payments for its use of the iconic DeLorean DMC-12 sports car on "Back to the Future" merchandise, a California federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Carnegie Must Pay Fees For 'Unreasonable' Diamond IP Suit

    A New York federal judge ruled Wednesday that Carnegie Institute of Washington and its bankrupt former patent licensee M7D Corp. are jointly and severally liable for paying Fenix Diamond LLC's attorney fees and nontaxable expenses for pursuing their "objectively unreasonable" infringement suit for years.

  • February 22, 2024

    New PTAB Panel Revives DraftKings Patent Challenge

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board's new Delegated Rehearing Panel has found that a petition by DraftKings challenging a patent owned by rival Colossus Bets was wrongly denied, because the original panel misinterpreted a term in the patent.

  • February 22, 2024

    Bong Co. Can't Win Against Shop That Didn't Appear In Court

    The maker of Stündenglass-branded glass infusers shouldn't get a win over a retailer that didn't bother to put up a defense against the manufacturer's trademark infringement suit, a federal court recommended, noting that this is at least the fourth time the company's claims against California smoke shop owners has missed the mark when seeking a default judgment.

  • February 22, 2024

    Trump Atty Sanctioned For Filing IP Suit On Gut Feelings

    A Florida federal judge has sanctioned an attorney who said he could "just know" if a product infringed his client's patents, rather than conducting a factual investigation — a move that the attorney claimed was backlash for representing former President Donald Trump elsewhere.

  • February 22, 2024

    Pool Co. Used Rival's TM To Confuse Customers, NC Jury Told

    A swimming pool equipment manufacturer is using a competitor's trademarks to try to pass off its replacement parts on Amazon as being endorsed by its rival, a North Carolina federal jury heard Thursday during opening statements of a trial in Charlotte.

  • February 22, 2024

    IP Forecast: Samsung Eyes Ex-Attys' Litigation Funder Chats

    Samsung plans to ask a Texas court to force a patent litigation business to disclose communications with litigation funders ahead of a trial next month over whether the tech giant's former in-house counsel stole trade secrets. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 22, 2024

    OpenSky Tells Vidal VLSI Fees Relied On 'Fabricated' Exhibit

    OpenSky Industries LLC has asked the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office director to reconsider making it pay $413,000 in attorney fees to VLSI Technology, arguing in a newly unsealed filing that she failed to justify the award and allowed records "fabricated" by VLSI. 

  • February 22, 2024

    Study Aid Biz Chegg Tries To Sink 'Cheating' Suit In Del.

    Attorneys for online book and study aid giant Chegg Inc. told a Delaware vice chancellor on Thursday that stockholders have failed to assemble defensible claims in a suit accusing the company of operating as a cheating service for students, saying they are trying to circumvent a stay for litigation in California federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • Inside The PTAB's Seagen Cancer Drug Patent Decision

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    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board's recent finding that Seagen's claims for antibody-drug conjugate technology were unpatentable — for lack of enablement, lack of written description and anticipation — mark the latest chapter in the complex patent dispute as the case heads for director review, says Ryan Hagglund at Loeb & Loeb.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Opinion

    Biden Admin's March-In Plan Would Hurt Medical Innovation

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    The Biden administration's proposal to reinterpret the Bayh-Dole Act and allow the government to claw back patents when it determines that a commercialized product's price is too high would discourage private investment in important research and development, says Ken Thorpe at the Rollins School of Public Health.

  • Google Patent Case Is A Claim Construction Litigation Lesson

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    The Federal Circuit's recent precedential decision in Google v. EcoFactor, which held that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board erred in the claim construction it had unknowingly adopted, shows that litigators should be alert to claim construction issues that masquerade as something else, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • How High Court SEC Case Could Affect The ITC

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Jarkesy will likely spare the U.S. International Trade Commission from major operative changes, the ITC’s ability to issue penalties for violations of its orders may change, say Gwendolyn Tawresey and Ryan Deck at Troutman Pepper.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Aldi Design Infringement Case Highlights Assessment Issues

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    The forthcoming English Court of Appeal decision in Marks and Spencer v. Aldi, regarding the alleged infringement of design rights, could provide practitioners with new guidance, particularly in relation to the relevant date for assessment of infringement and the weight that should be attributed to certain design elements in making this assessment, say Rory Graham and Georgia Davis at RPC.

  • Opinion

    9th Circ. Should Overturn The Miles Davis Tattoo Ruling

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    A California district court made several missteps that led to a finding that celebrity artist Kat Von D's Miles Davis tattoo did not infringe copyright, and the Ninth Circuit should overturn the decision because recent U.S. Supreme Court guidance was ignored and the jury did not receive adequate instruction, says Brian Moriarty at Hamilton Brook.

  • Generative AI Raises IP, Data Protection And Contracts Issues

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    As the EU's recent agreement on the Artificial Intelligence Act has fueled businesses' interest in adopting generative AI tools, it is crucial to understand how these tools utilize material to generate output and what questions to ask in relation to intellectual property, data privacy and contracts, say lawyers at Deloitte Legal.

  • Exporters Should Approach Self-Disclosure With Caution

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    A January Bureau of Industry and Security memorandum created an abbreviated process for disclosing export control violations that lack aggravating factors, but deciding which disclosure method to utilize remains a complex strategic undertaking to which companies must give careful consideration, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Is Compulsory Copyright Licensing Needed For AI Tech?

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    The U.S. Copyright Office's inquiry into whether Congress should establish a compulsory licensing regime for artificial intelligence technologies that are trained on copyrighted works has received relatively little attention — but commenters recently opposed the regime under three key themes, say Michael Kientzle and Ryan White at Arnold & Porter.

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