New Jersey

  • February 26, 2024

    NJ, Solvay Push Back Against Town's Bid To Pause PFAS Deal

    New Jersey and the American arm of Belgian chemical company Solvay slammed a Garden State town's bid to pause the final approval of a $393 million settlement over "forever chemical" contamination, calling it disingenuous and arguing such a move would only delay the assistance the settlement would provide towns impacted by the pollution.

  • February 26, 2024

    Black Truck Drivers Can't Revive Race Bias Suit At 3rd Circ.

    Two Black truck drivers for a supermarket chain couldn't beat "voluminous evidence" that they were fired for threatening a co-worker who one called a "rat" or a "snitch," the Third Circuit ruled, refusing to revive their suit blaming race bias for their termination.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Pass On Venue Fight In Erie Indemnity Fees Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review the Third Circuit's refusal to transfer a case challenging Erie Indemnity Co. management fees from state court back to federal court, preserving the lower court's precedential ruling that the matter does not qualify as a class action under the Class Action Fairness Act.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Trustee Objects To Rite Aid Disclosure Statement

    The U.S. Trustee's Office has flagged what it called "objectionable" proposals from Rite Aid to hold post-confirmation votes on some Chapter 11 plan releases, as well as shortening senior secured voting and preemptively deeming unsecured creditors as detractors.

  • February 23, 2024

    Rutgers Law Students Rip Classmate's Bias Suit Subpoenas

    A pair of Rutgers Law School students asked a New Jersey state court to shut down subpoenas they received as part of a classmate's suit accusing the school of antisemitic bias for opening a disciplinary investigation against him after he spoke out against the same pair of students for allegedly spreading antisemitism.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Professor Atty Hits NJ University With Retaliatory Firing Suit

    New Jersey City University has been slammed with a lawsuit in state court from an attorney and former professor who claims he was demoted and then fired in retaliation for reporting that a former university official allegedly sexually harassed a student.

  • February 23, 2024

    ACLU Kicks Off Clemency Project To Reduce NJ Incarceration

    The American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey has launched a new initiative aimed at reducing sentences for incarcerated victims of domestic violence and people facing extreme trial penalties, advocating for a framework that calls on the governor to holistically consider injustices facing those groups of people when making decisions on clemency.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Software Co. Worker Axed For Unpaid Wage Ask, Suit Says

    A software company fired an 86-year-old employee after he complained that he was not paid for months of work, the worker alleged in a lawsuit filed in New Jersey state court, saying his former employer owes him more than $16,000 in unpaid wages and $32,000 in damages.

  • February 22, 2024

    YouTube Privacy Judge 'Flummoxed' By Kids' Liability Theory

    A California federal judge indicated Thursday that she's open to trimming a revived proposed class action alleging Google and companies that host child-friendly YouTube channels illegally collected children's data from targeted ads, expressing concerns about the requested relief and saying she's "flummoxed" by the consumers' belated liability theory against the channels' owners.

  • February 22, 2024

    NYC Doc Charged Over $20M Lab-Fraud Kickback Scheme

    A federal grand jury in New Jersey has returned an indictment charging a medical doctor with receiving kickbacks in exchange for ordering medically unnecessary tests from lab companies that submitted roughly $20.7 million in false Medicare claims, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • February 22, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Protect AbbVie's Atty-Client Communications

    The Third Circuit has denied AbbVie Inc.'s bid to block a Pennsylvania federal court's order to turn over attorney communications from a patent case allegedly cooked up just to extend the company's monopoly on a testosterone drug, but the appellate court's explanation remained under seal Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fire Product Makers Try To Move PFAS Suit To Fed. Court

    A group of chemical companies that produce fire suppressants are seeking to move to federal court a suit brought by the Connecticut attorney general looking to rein in the use of PFAS chemicals, saying they are entitled to a federal forum to exercise a "government contractor" defense.

  • February 22, 2024

    AI Software Co. Hasn't Actually Developed AI, Suit Says

    Software and data engineering company Innodata Inc. has been hit with a proposed class action alleging its stock price dropped more than 30% after a financial research firm published a report saying its promised artificial intelligence technology is "smoke and mirrors" and that its marketing claims are like "putting lipstick on a pig."

  • February 22, 2024

    Bumble Reaches $315K Settlement In Criminal Screening Case

    Dating app company Bumble has agreed to pay $315,000 and change its business practices to settle claims brought by New Jersey Attorney General Matthew Platkin that it failed to disclose its criminal background-check screening policies.

  • February 22, 2024

    NJ Public Defender Gets Partial Win In Atty's Bias Case

    A New Jersey state judge on Thursday tossed several allegations against the state's Office of the Public Defender in a suit brought by a former employee alleging that she was forced to resign because of discrimination and a hostile work environment, ruling that she failed to provide the state agency with proper notice of her complaint.

  • February 22, 2024

    B. Riley Stands By Franchise Group Deal After Internal Review

    B. Riley Financial reaffirmed its commitment to the $2.6 billion take-private deal for Franchise Group Inc. despite the misconduct of former Franchise Group CEO Brian Kahn, saying on Thursday that its audit committee determined through a nine-week internal review that B. Riley had no knowledge of or involvement in the misconduct.

  • February 21, 2024

    TD Bank Customers Seek OK On $32.2M Overdraft Fee Deal

    A class of TD Bank customers asked a New Jersey federal judge Wednesday for her preliminary approval of a $21.97 million deal over allegedly improper overdraft fees in debit card transactions, plus $10.25 million in reductions to outstanding balances for accounts that were closed with amounts due to the bank.

  • February 21, 2024

    'No Theft' Of Eagles Lyrics, Trio Says As NY Trial Opens

    Three men accused of trying to sell stolen draft lyrics from the classic Eagles album "Hotel California" told a New York state judge presiding over their criminal bench trial on Wednesday that there was "no theft" and that prosecutors owed them an apology.

  • February 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Finds Art Supply Co. Illegally Fired Temp. Worker

    The Third Circuit backed a National Labor Relations Board decision that found an art supply company illegally let go of a Black temporary worker who raised complaints about racism in the workplace, saying Wednesday there was enough evidence to uphold the board's conclusions.

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Squabble Over Emergency Review Of EPA Smog Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court's liberal wing denounced during oral argument Wednesday their colleagues' decision to consider the merits of four related emergency requests to prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing a plan to reduce cross-state pollution without first getting lower court input.

  • February 21, 2024

    SPAC Boom Costs Auditor $2M In PCAOB Fine

    New Jersey-based auditing firm WithumSmith+Brown PC was sanctioned with a $2 million fine Wednesday by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, which accused the company of taking on more work than it could handle as the market for special purpose acquisition companies boomed.

  • February 21, 2024

    CoStar, Hotel Giants Accused Of Data-Driven Price-Fixing

    Hilton, Hyatt and other big name hotel operators are the target of a proposed class action alleging they colluded with hospitality industry analytics firm CoStar Group Inc. to fix prices in luxury hotel markets in Seattle and other major U.S. cities, according to a suit filed in Washington federal court.

  • February 21, 2024

    Rite Aid Gets OK To End Former Queens Store Lease

    Rite Aid Corp. was given permission Wednesday to reject a lease and sublease for a former store in Queens, New York, after a New Jersey bankruptcy judge found that doing so would benefit the debtor's estate.

  • February 21, 2024

    Scammer Freed By Trump Indicted On New Charges

    A previously convicted scammer whose sentence was commuted by former President Donald Trump has been indicted by a grand jury on new charges that he began running multiple rackets, including a fraudulent aid-for-Ukraine scheme, shortly after leaving prison, New Jersey's top federal prosecutor said.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • As Promised, IRS Is Coming For Crypto Tax Evaders

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    The IRS is fulfilling its promise to crack down on those who have neglected to pay taxes on cryptocurrency earnings, as demonstrated by recently imposed prison sentences, enforcement initiatives and meetings with international counterparts — suggesting a few key takeaways for taxpayer compliance, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • The Questions Around Prometheum's SEC-Compliant Strategy

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    While the rest of the crypto industry has been engaged in a long-running battle to escape the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's jurisdiction, a once-obscure startup called Prometheum has instead embraced the SEC's view to become the first crypto special-purpose broker-dealer, but it's unclear whether it can turn its favored status into a workable business, says Keith Blackman at Bracewell.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

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