North Carolina

  • April 02, 2024

    Food Co. Gets New Shot At H-2B Hires For Cinco De Mayo

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board revived a food producer's bid to hire 55 foreign workers to help out with increased demand during Cinco de Mayo celebrations, saying the company clearly showed there's a production uptick during the spring through the summer.

  • April 02, 2024

    Rental Co. Sues Family Of Child Who Drowned On Property

    A North Carolina beach vacation rental company, facing a negligence lawsuit brought by a father whose son died in one of its pools, has in turn filed suit against the deceased child's extended family members, claiming that any blame for the death should be on their shoulders.

  • April 02, 2024

    Cemetery Owner Can't Sell Unused Land, NC Panel Rules

    The operator of two North Carolina cemeteries couldn't convince the state Court of Appeals to let her section off unused land for a potential sale, with a three-judge panel ruling Tuesday state law forbids her from transferring the property even if remains are not interred.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Seek Use Of 'Intertwined' Evidence In NC Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors have asked a North Carolina district court to permit tangential evidence in a tax fraud trial, saying that the evidence is "inextricably intertwined with the charged conduct" of two St. Louis attorneys and a North Carolina insurance agent.

  • April 02, 2024

    Law Firm Can't Make Atty Arbitrate Pay Spat, NC Panel Rules

    A local law firm can't force a former shareholder to arbitrate his suit alleging he was stiffed on pay, the North Carolina Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday, saying it would be a stretch to find his claims stem from two side agreements containing arbitration clauses.

  • April 01, 2024

    Insurance Mogul's Cos. Want $161M Arbitration Case Tossed

    Two companies associated with Greg Lindberg are looking to nix litigation filed by defunct Dutch life insurer Conservatrix to enforce an arbitral award that could force the embattled insurance mogul to fork over about $161 million, arguing that the award orders only provisional relief and is not enforceable.

  • April 01, 2024

    EPA Asks 4th Circ. To Review Panel's Split Ozone Decision

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has told the Fourth Circuit that a panel of judges incorrectly rejected its attempt to move West Virginia's lawsuit over an ozone regulation program to a different court.

  • April 01, 2024

    Pool Co. Seeks $4.36M In Atty Fees After False Ad Verdict

    Attorneys from McCarter & English LLP and Womble Bond Dickinson LLP are seeking more than $4 million in fees following a multimillion-dollar verdict in a North Carolina false advertising and unfair business practices suit involving rival pool supply companies.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Pharma Co. Exec Denies Signing Noncompete Deal

    The former director of government sales for a pharmaceutical company asked the North Carolina Business Court on Friday to knock out a breach of contract claim in a lawsuit that alleges he took trade secrets to a competitor, arguing the company has no valid noncompete agreement to back it up.

  • April 01, 2024

    Feds Back Guilty Verdict After Software Execs' Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors on Monday defended a jury verdict finding two former software executives in North Carolina guilty of failing to pay employment taxes, saying sufficient evidence supported their convictions.

  • April 01, 2024

    Immigration Atty Can't Challenge Suspension For Phone Use

    An immigration attorney can't challenge her suspension before the Board of Immigration Appeals for refusing to stop using her phone in court, as a North Carolina federal judge has found the case moot because she failed to show how her reputation has continued to be harmed.

  • March 29, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Tears Cancer Testing Rivals Apart In Injunction Args

    A trio of Federal Circuit judges appeared fed up Friday with a Morrison Foerster LLP attorney who they repeatedly suggested was focusing on arguments not raised to the district court judge who had blocked her client from selling certain cancer tests while facing infringement litigation.

  • March 29, 2024

    4th Circ. Revives Data Breach Suit Against Medical Center

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday revived a proposed class action alleging that Sandhills Medical Foundation Inc. failed to protect the personal information of patients whose data was leaked following a cyberattack, saying the health care provider is not shielded under federal immunity and that the government cannot be substituted as a defendant.

  • March 29, 2024

    BofA Unfairly Charges Fees For Others' Bad Checks, Suit Says

    Bank of America is the latest financial institution to face a class action alleging it wrongfully charged customers a fee when they deposited checks that then bounced.

  • March 29, 2024

    Lowe's Lies 'Destroyed' Vendor's Business, NC Suit Says

    A home accents company alleged that Lowe's sought to "destroy" it with "bogus" complaints about product quality and the business' financial health, costing it tens of millions of dollars while usurping its business model.

  • March 29, 2024

    Tax Preparer Gets 30 Months For $780K COVID Aid Scheme

    A North Carolina tax preparer who fraudulently obtained $780,000 in pandemic relief loans and laundered money was sentenced in federal court to 30 months in prison and three years of supervised release, prosecutors announced.

  • March 29, 2024

    8 States Seek $122M After Robocaller Allegedly Ignored Ban

    Attorneys general from eight states urged a federal judge to modify an existing injunction barring a businessman from engaging in robocalling or telemarketing campaigns, asserting he has violated that order, should be held in contempt and must pay $122 million.

  • March 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Former NC Chief Justice Cheri Beasley

    It's been more than three years since former North Carolina Supreme Court Justice Cheri Beasley left the bench, accelerating her return to private practice and paving the way for a contested U.S. congressional campaign.

  • March 28, 2024

    4th Circ. Rejects Black Voters' Pleas To Block NC Senate Map

    A split Fourth Circuit panel on Thursday opted against interfering with one of North Carolina's newly drawn voter maps as the 2024 election cycle gets underway, rejecting pleas from Black voters who claim the state Senate districts have been unfairly drawn to dilute their voting power.

  • March 28, 2024

    Medical Lab Inks $2.1M Deal To End NC's False Claims Probe

    A North Carolina lab will pay back $2.1 million to the state's Medicaid program after settling an investigation into how it charged the public health program for tests, the state attorney general's office announced Thursday.

  • March 28, 2024

    NC Atty Says Career Coaching Business Stiffed Him On Pay

    A North Carolina lawyer said this week that he hasn't been paid for his work at a career coaching business in which he owns a minority stake after he discovered the company was bleeding funds and rife with mismanagement, according to an amended state business court complaint.

  • March 28, 2024

    NC Atty Calls Airline Mogul's Bank Records Request 'Reckless'

    A North Carolina attorney has asked a federal court to snuff a request by an airline tycoon to dig into the attorney's banking records as part of a hacking conspiracy lawsuit, arguing the request is an overbroad, "reckless" grab at irrelevant information.

  • March 28, 2024

    SC Can Use Challenged Elections Map Amid Justices' Review

    A federal judicial panel ruled Thursday that South Carolina can conduct its 2024 elections under a congressional map it found unconstitutionally discriminates against Black voters, and which the U.S. Supreme Court is reviewing, saying it's now too late in the election cycle to make changes to the map.

  • March 27, 2024

    Justices Poised To Expand Repeat Offenders' Jury Trial Rights

    The U.S. Supreme Court appeared likely Wednesday to agree with the Biden administration and the criminal defense bar that repeat offenders have a constitutional right to let a jury decide if past offenses were sufficiently distinct to trigger lengthy prison terms under a prominent sentencing enhancement.

  • March 27, 2024

    Pool Co. Says Objection To Trial Attys Leaving Is 'Misplaced'

    A swimming pool equipment maker has hit back at objections to some of its counsel exiting the case after a nearly $15 million trial loss over false ad claims in North Carolina, saying its rival's grievances are "misplaced."

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Tide May Be Turning On Texas Two-Step Bankruptcy Strategy

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    Recent developments in several high-profile bankruptcy cases suggest that the use of the Texas Two-Step to shield solvent companies from tort claims may be falling out of favor, but until the U.S. Supreme Court hears one of these cases the strategy will remain divisive and the subject of increased scrutiny, say attorneys at Rivkin Radler.

  • Sackett Ruling, 'Waters' Rule Fix Won't Dry Up Wetlands Suits

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Sackett v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency narrowing the scope of Clean Water Act protections, the Biden administration is amending its rule defining "waters of the United States" — but the revised rule will inevitably face further court challenges, continuing the WOTUS legal saga indefinitely, say attorneys at Milbank.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • High Court 'Purely Legal' Appeal Ruling Raises New Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous May decision in Dupree v. Younger, holding that “purely legal” arguments rejected at summary judgment can be appealed without post-trial motions, resolves a circuit split but creates new questions that appellate counsel must now carefully navigate in each circuit, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • 4 Legal Issues Grant-Funded Broadband Projects May Face

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    The Biden administration's recently announced funding allocations represent the largest ever government investment in broadband internet infrastructure, but these new development opportunities will require navigation of complicated and sometimes arcane legal environments, says Casey Lide at Keller & Heckman.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

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    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Supreme Court's NC Election Map Ruling Protects Pa. Voters

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    By assuring the applicability of state constitutional provisions to state election laws, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision, Moore v. Harper, represents a significant victory for fair elections — especially in Pennsylvania, where courts have applied the state's free and equal elections clause to forbid partisan gerrymandering, say Robert Wiygul and John Hill at Hangley Aronchick.

  • Opinion

    States Must Fight Predatory Real Estate Listing Agreements

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    As momentum against long-term real estate listing agreements continues to grow, states should take action to render existing agreements unenforceable and discourage future unfair and deceptive trade practices in real estate, says Elizabeth Blosser at the American Land Title Association.

  • The Differing Court Approaches To Pay Equity Questions

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    Employers face the tough task of navigating an increasingly complex patchwork of pay equity laws and court interpretations, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • Georgia-Pacific Ruling Furthers Texas Two-Step Challenges

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    With its recent ruling in the case of Bestwall, barring asbestos injury litigation against nondebtor Georgia-Pacific, the Fourth Circuit joins a growing body of courts addressing the Texas Two-Step's legality, fueled by concerns over the proper use of bankruptcy as a tool for addressing such claims, says George Singer at Holland & Hart.

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