North Carolina

  • April 25, 2024

    Attys, Insurance Agent Found Guilty Of Tax-Avoidance Scheme

    Two St. Louis tax attorneys and a North Carolina insurance agent on Thursday were found guilty on all counts of conspiring to defraud the federal government and aiding in the filing of false tax returns for their role in a tax avoidance scheme that prosecutors claim cost the Internal Revenue Service more than $4 million.

  • April 25, 2024

    Ex-Defender Says Feds Can't Hide Other Harassment Reports

    A former assistant federal defender wants to make certain #MeToo evidence public following the trial in a case accusing the judiciary of botching its probe into her own sexual harassment complaint, saying the contents of similar allegations concerning the Federal Defender's Office have already been publicly revealed.

  • April 25, 2024

    Fla. Sues ACC, Saying Media Contracts Are Public Records

    Florida's attorney general sued the Atlantic Coast Conference on Thursday, claiming the collegiate athletic conference wrongfully withheld media rights contracts from public review that are at the center of Florida State University's fight to leave the ACC.

  • April 24, 2024

    Tax Fraud Case Skewed By Prosecutors' Spin, NC Jury Told

    Prosecutors and defense attorneys in a tax fraud trial against two lawyers and an insurance agent traded final barbs Wednesday in a North Carolina courtroom before sending the jury to deliberate, with the defendants again defending the tax plan at the center of the government's case and accusing prosecutors of making up facts.

  • April 24, 2024

    NC Biz Court Trims School Food Servicer's Noncompete Suit

    The North Carolina Business Court on Wednesday pared a cafeteria food provider's lawsuit alleging a former sales director absconded with confidential information to a rival business, reasoning the Tar Heel State's laws aren't applicable over alleged out-of-state conduct.

  • April 24, 2024

    Feds Want Disbarred Atty's FOIA Suit Over USPTO Docs Axed

    The federal government urged a North Carolina federal court Wednesday to toss a disbarred attorney's sprawling Freedom of Information Act lawsuit over U.S. Patent and Trademark Office documents, arguing the case is one of a dozen duplicative, meritless suits the plaintiff has filed.

  • April 24, 2024

    3 Takeaways On How AI Is Forcing Publicity Rights To Evolve

    As digital replicas of someone's voice, image or likeness become easier to create with the help of artificial intelligence, this new era of deepfakes is shining a spotlight on the nation's patchwork of right-of-publicity laws and raising questions over when Congress may act to pass a national framework.  

  • April 24, 2024

    Borrower Asks Full 4th Circ. To Hear Debt Canceling Case

    A student loan borrower has asked the full Fourth Circuit to rehear his claims that a Pennsylvania loan servicer thwarted forgiveness of his federal student loans, arguing that the circuit court had overlooked parts of the loan servicing agreement that provided important context to his argument.

  • April 24, 2024

    McKesson Ends Ex-Sales VP's Title VII Suit Over Vax Refusal

    McKesson Corp. reached an agreement with a former sales vice president to end her lawsuit accusing the drug distributor of firing her because her Christian beliefs barred her from getting the COVID-19 vaccine, according to a filing in North Carolina federal court.

  • April 24, 2024

    Raleigh, NC, Seeks Dismissal Of Ex-Cop's OT Suit

    The city of Raleigh, North Carolina, asked a federal judge Wednesday to toss an ex-police officer's lawsuit alleging it illegally compelled officers to accept time off rather than pay overtime premiums, arguing it acted in accordance with federal labor law.

  • April 24, 2024

    4th Circ. Revives Worker's Age Bias Suit Against IT Co.

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday reinstated a former information technology company worker's lawsuit alleging she was unlawfully fired and replaced by someone nearly 30 years her junior, saying a trial court held her to too high a standard when it threw out her case.

  • April 23, 2024

    Feds Urge Court To Admit Ex-VP Info In Mogul's Bribery Case

    Federal prosecutors have struck back against embattled insurance mogul Greg Linderg's attempt to keep evidence about a former employee's alleged involvement in a bribery scheme from a jury, telling the court that the employee's acquittal on related charges doesn't make evidence dealing with him inadmissible.

  • April 23, 2024

    NC Justices Urged To Reject Greg Lindberg Co.'s Review Bid

    North Carolina's insurance commissioner urged the state's supreme court to prevent a company controlled by insurance mogul Greg Lindberg from intervening in the liquidation proceedings of two of his life insurance companies, arguing a state appeals panel correctly held that an insurer's directors, but not shareholders, may intervene.

  • April 23, 2024

    Ex-Public Defender Wants 4th Circ. To End Wait In Bias Suit

    A former public defender suing the federal judiciary for allegedly failing to take her sexual harassment claims seriously asked the Fourth Circuit on Tuesday to force a federal judge's hand after more than four months without a ruling following a bench trial, saying a decision on her long-pending bid for a preliminary injunction is overdue.

  • April 23, 2024

    NC Felony Voting Law Struck Down As Unconstitutional

    A North Carolina federal judge has struck down the state's 147-year-old law making it a crime for convicted felons to vote, finding that the statute disproportionately targets Black voters and had been inconsistently enforced in violation of the U.S. Constitution.

  • April 23, 2024

    BofA Nears Deal Over 'Hidden' Wire Transfer Junk Fees

    Bank of America has agreed to resolve a proposed class action accusing it of tacking on $15 "junk fees" for incoming wire transfers, and a North Carolina federal judge on Monday gave the parties until May 24 to submit a motion for preliminary approval of the settlement.

  • April 22, 2024

    Feds Botched Building Contract Prices, Watchdog Reports

    Federal building overseers in the Southeast U.S. used distorted pricing for medium-term construction contracts that produced significantly inflated and unreasonably low-cost estimates, according to a government watchdog.

  • April 22, 2024

    NC Justice Dept. Seeks Early Win In Promotion Bias Suit

    The North Carolina Department of Justice urged a federal court to take its side in an attorney's lawsuit alleging she faced discrimination at the agency for being a Black woman, arguing that the white man who got the job for which she'd interviewed was the most qualified candidate.

  • April 22, 2024

    NC Chemical Biz Wants Help Covering $5M Site Cleanup

    A chemical company asked a North Carolina federal court on Monday to force other chemical makers, including a Koch Industries subsidiary, to contribute to the roughly $5 million cleanup of a contaminated site, contending the other companies owned or operated parts of the site for years.

  • April 22, 2024

    Opioid Marketer Completes $1.5M Damages Settlement With Del.

    Delaware's chancellor signed off Monday on a $1.5 million payment to the state by a company that helped Purdue Pharmaceuticals market its opioid products, the latest step in a $358 million, 50-state damages settlement reached with Publicis Health LLC.

  • April 22, 2024

    Lessee Axed From NC Doctor's Quarrel With Ex-Partner

    The North Carolina Business Court has purged a defendant from an ophthalmologist's lawsuit claiming his former partner has reneged on a settlement to buy out the ophthalmologist's half of the practice, finding the defendant wasn't a party to the settlement and can't now be bound to it.

  • April 22, 2024

    Senate OKs Permanent Status For 10 Fed. District Judgeships

    The U.S. Senate has unanimously passed a bill put forth by a bipartisan group of lawmakers that would transition 10 previously temporary district court judgeships in 10 states to permanent posts, including in Texas, California and Florida.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices To Mull Atty Fees For Preliminary Injunctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear a case that could determine whether litigants can receive attorney fees for "prevailing" in a case by winning a preliminary injunction, despite never securing a final judgment.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Won't Probe Athlete's Interest In NCAA Eligibility

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left in place a Fourth Circuit decision finding student athletes lack a business or property interest in their eligibility to play on the college level even though they can now be compensated for it.

  • April 19, 2024

    Enviro Groups Say Federal Plan Threatens At-Risk Bats

    A coalition of environmental groups sued the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday in North Carolina federal court alleging that a plan to allow logging in the Nantahala and Pisgah national forests will harm endangered bats on the brink of extinction.

Expert Analysis

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

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    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Earnout Contract Considerations After NC Good Faith Ruling

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    The North Carolina Supreme Court's recent Value Health Solutions v. Pharmaceutical Research decision, holding the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing did not apply in an earnout dispute related to an asset sale, demonstrates the need for practitioners to pay careful attention to milestone concepts in M&A transactions, says Benjamin Hicks at Wagner Hicks.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • How Executives' Deposition Standards Can Differ

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    The recent Trustees of Purdue University v. Wolfspeed Inc. decision granting a motion on a protective order for a high-level witness shows how courts can vary in the application of the apex doctrine and analysis under Rule 26 of the Federal Rule of Civil Procedure, say Genevieve Halpenny and John Cook at Barclay Damon.

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