Public Policy

  • May 24, 2024

    New Minnesota Law Removes Barriers To Public Broadband

    Public broadband advocates on Friday lauded Minnesota's enactment of a state law making it easier to deploy community broadband networks.

  • May 24, 2024

    FCC Probing Unauthorized Navigation Satellite Signals In US

    The Federal Communications Commission is continuing its investigation into U.S. phones receiving unauthorized Russian and Chinese navigation satellite signals, but FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel told lawmakers last week that she didn't have much more to share on the inquiry.

  • May 24, 2024

    CFPB Will Ask DC Circ. To Rescue Rule Challenged By PayPal

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Friday it will appeal a Washington, D.C., federal judge's recent decision that sided with payments giant PayPal in its lawsuit challenging the agency's extension of certain prepaid card regulations to digital wallets.

  • May 24, 2024

    NC Bill Will Let Attys Expunge Discipline Records

    The North Carolina Senate approved a measure Thursday that would allow attorneys to clear certain disciplinary actions from their professional records, along with other changes to the Tar Heel State's lawyer ethics process.

  • May 24, 2024

    Ex-DOJ Atty Clark Says He Was Denied A Fair Ethics Hearing

    Former Justice Department official Jeffrey Clark was denied a fair hearing in his Washington, D.C., ethics case and should not face punishment, he told an attorney disciplinary committee in a Thursday filing.

  • May 24, 2024

    Any Coloradan Can Enforce Open Meetings Law, Panel Says

    The Colorado Court of Appeals has sided with an attorney who has filed dozens of open meetings law claims against government bodies in the state, finding that the attorney has standing to sue a school board even though he lives hundreds of miles away.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden Urges 1st Circ. To Find Debt Cap Challenge Moot

    The Biden administration asked the First Circuit to affirm a finding that a government workers' union lacks standing to challenge the debt ceiling's constitutionality and that its case was further rendered moot by passage of a deal to suspend the spending limit until January.

  • May 24, 2024

    Fulton DA Appeals Nixing Of Six Counts In Ga. Elections Case

    The Fulton County District Attorney's Office said it is appealing a ruling that dismissed six counts from the Georgia election interference indictment of former President Donald Trump and his co-defendants.

  • May 24, 2024

    CFPB Seeks $20M Penalty For Inaccurate Loan Data

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has urged a Florida federal court to hit Freedom Mortgage with a $20 million civil penalty for allegedly submitting error-filled government mortgage loan data.

  • May 24, 2024

    IRS Corrects Notice On Bonus Energy Tax Credit Safe Harbors

    The Internal Revenue Service and U.S. Department of the Treasury issued a correction Friday to a notice providing additional safe harbors that clean energy project developers can use to qualify for bonus tax credits for domestically sourcing their steel and aluminum parts.

  • May 24, 2024

    Feds Prep Dumping Duties On Indonesian, Ecuadorian Shrimp

    The U.S. Department of Commerce preliminarily found that Ecuadorian and Indonesian shrimp were being sold in the U.S. at unfairly low prices, unveiling a slate of tariffs to address the dumping.

  • May 24, 2024

    Menendez, Kasowitz Firm Spar Over Subpoena To Cooperator

    Amid his bribery trial, U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey is urging a Manhattan federal judge to order a government cooperator to turn over communications involving his current counsel at Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP and his former attorneys.

  • May 24, 2024

    DOJ's Live Nation-Ticketmaster Suit: What You Should Know

    The U.S. Department of Justice and a slew of state attorneys general filed a suit challenging the 2010 merger of Ticketmaster and Live Nation. Here, catch up on Law360's coverage of the deal and those who have challenged it along the way – Taylor Swift fans, investors and regulators.

  • May 23, 2024

    CFPB's 1st Try At BNPL Regulation Could Set Stage For More

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's new guidance that treats buy-now, pay-later firms more like credit card companies is drawing industry grumbles about "apples to oranges" comparisons, but consumer advocates say that applying additional credit card-esque rules would be the cherry on top.

  • May 23, 2024

    Entrepreneur Ordered To Pay $15M For Unlicensed Pot Stores

    A New York state court hit a cannabis seller with a $15 million judgment Thursday after he was found to be selling marijuana without a license at seven locations inside the state, according to an announcement by the state's attorney general.

  • May 23, 2024

    Latham, Cravath Rep Live Nation In DOJ Ticketmaster Battle

    In the battle against the U.S. Department of Justice's push to break up Live Nation and Ticketmaster, the concert promotion and ticketing company has called upon a team of attorneys at Cravath Swaine & Moore and Latham & Watkins to go up against a large roster of highly experienced government antitrust attorneys.

  • May 23, 2024

    CBP Had No Right To Collect Disputed Duties, Importer Says

    A tire importer is fighting government calls to dismiss its suit seeking to recoup duties it says U.S. Customs and Border Protection unlawfully collected while under dispute, urging the trade court to reject CBP's claim that the agency was constrained to follow orders.

  • May 23, 2024

    FCC Defends Nielsen Data In Low-Power TV Licensing Suit

    The Federal Communications Commission is defending its use of Nielsen statistics to determine if a low-power TV station should receive protections provided under a 2022 law aimed at safeguarding local and rural broadcasting.

  • May 23, 2024

    House Panel Moves Data Privacy Bill, While Vowing Revisions

    A U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on Thursday advanced a bipartisan proposal to create a nationwide framework for how companies use and share consumers' personal information, despite lawmakers on both sides of the aisle acknowledging that more work needs to be done to further refine the measure.

  • May 23, 2024

    Green Groups Sue Colo. Over Factory Farm Pollution Regs

    Two environmental groups on Thursday urged a Colorado state court to review the Centennial state's decision to issue a permit allowing large animal feeding facilities to operate without monitoring requirements, saying waterways and the public are being exposed to dangerous toxins produced by thousands of animals.

  • May 23, 2024

    Calif. High Court Deals Loss To Policyholder In COVID-19 Suit

    The California Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the coronavirus generally doesn't cause the kind of damage to property that would trigger coverage under an insurance policy, handing a win to a Chubb insurance company in one of the last major venues for pandemic coverage litigation.

  • May 23, 2024

    Israeli Attys Complain To USPTO After Pro-Gaza Reddit Post

    Various groups of Israeli lawyers have told the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that they are concerned about the "potential influence that individual political views may have on the examination of patent applications of Israel applicants."

  • May 23, 2024

    SD Governor Now Banned By All Nine Of State's Tribes

    The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe is asking South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem to clarify and apologize for her repeated statements that tribal leaders are working with drug cartels after its executive council voted to ban her from their lands, becoming the last of the state's nine tribes to take such action.

  • May 23, 2024

    SEC Opens Gate To Ether ETFs, But Firms Await Green Light

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission started the process of bringing exchange-traded funds holding the cryptocurrency ether to market on Thursday when it approved a series of filings permitting national securities exchanges to list the products, leaving firms to wait for the next step before trading can begin.

  • May 23, 2024

    RFK Jr.'s Anti-Vax Suit Against Wash. AG Tossed

    A Washington federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. on behalf of NBA legend John Stockton trying to shield doctors who make anti-vaccine statements, ruling claims that a medical board probe has chilled speech are speculative.

Expert Analysis

  • Liquidity Risk Management Tops NCUA Exam Priorities

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    As credit unions map their regulatory initiatives and audit plans, they should look to the National Credit Union Administration’s annual supervisory priorities, which include five important examination areas, including liquidity management and interest rate risk, say Juan Arciniegas and Judy Chen at Chapman and Cutler.

  • Protecting IP May Be Tricky Without Noncompetes

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    Contrary to the Federal Trade Commission's view, trade secret law cannot replace noncompetes' protection of proprietary information because intellectual property includes far more than just trade secrets, so businesses need to closely examine their IP protection options, say Aimee Fagan and Ching-Lee Fukuda at Sidley.

  • Regulating Resurrected Species Under The ESA

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    As the prospect of extinct species being resurrected from DNA and reintroduced into the wild grows closer, an analysis of the Endangered Species Act suggests that it could provide a thoughtful, flexible governance framework for such scenarios, say Caroline Meadows and Shelby Bobosky at the SMU Dedman School of Law.

  • A Look At FERC's Plan To End Reactive Power Compensation

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    A recent notice of proposed rulemaking indicates that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is likely to eliminate compensation for reactive power within the standard power factor range — causing significant impacts for the electric power industry, which relies on income from providing this service, say Norman Bay and Matthew Goldberg at Willkie and Vivian Chum at Wright & Talisman.

  • How FTC's Noncompete Rule May Affect Exec Comp Packages

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    In the event the Federal Trade Commission's final noncompete rule goes into effect as currently contemplated, companies will need to take stock of how they structure post-employment executive compensation arrangements, such as severance agreements and clawbacks, says Meredith O'Leary at King & Spalding.

  • Action Steps To Address New Restrictions On Outbound Data

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    Companies should immediately assess all their data-based operations so they can consider strategies to effectively mitigate new compliance risks brought on by recently implemented transaction restrictions, including a Justice Department proposal and landmark data legislation, say attorneys at Wiley.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • CFPB Reality Check: Video Game Cash Is Still Money

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's recent report examining payments within online video games indicates that financial services offered within the game marketplace are quickly evolving to the point where they are indistinguishable from traditional financial services subject to regulation, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • What CRA Deadline Means For Biden Admin. Rulemaking

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    With the 2024 election rapidly approaching, the Biden administration must race to finalize proposed agency actions within the next few weeks, or be exposed to the chance that the following Congress will overturn the rules under the Congressional Review Act, say attorneys at Covington.

  • 5 Takeaways From FDA's Biosimilars Promotion Guidance

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    New draft guidance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration expands upon other recent efforts to clarify expectations for biosimilar and interchangeable labeling, highlighting a number of potential missteps that could draw attention from regulators, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • The Legal Issues Raised In Minn. Rate Exportation Opt-Out Bill

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    A recent Minnesota House bill would amend state law by opting out of the federal interest rate preemption and introduce several legal gray areas if passed, including issues regarding loan location, rates on credit card loans and values of state charters, says Karen Grandstrand at Fredrikson & Byron.

  • Rebuttal

    Time For Congress To Let Qualified Older Pilots Keep Flying

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    While a previous Law360 guest article affirmed the current law requiring airline pilots to retire at age 65, the facts suggest that the pilots, their unions, the airlines and the flying public will all benefit if Congress allows experienced, medically qualified aviators to stay in the cockpit, say Allen Baker and Bo Ellis at Let Experienced Pilots Fly.

  • Does Expert Testimony Aid Preliminary IPR Responses?

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    Dechert attorneys analyze six years of patent owners' preliminary responses to inter partes review petitions to determine whether the elimination of the presumption favoring the petitioner as to preinstitution testimonial evidence affected the usefulness of expert testimony in responses.

  • Fostering Employee Retention Amid Shaky DEI Landscape

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    Ongoing challenges to the legality of corporate diversity, equity and inclusion programs are complicating efforts to use DEI as an employee retention tool, but with the right strategic approach employers can continue to recruit and retain diverse talent — even after the FTC’s ban on noncompetes, says Ally Coll at the Purple Method.

  • Are Concessions In FDA's Lab-Developed Tests Rule Enough?

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    Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's new policy for laboratory-developed tests included major strategic concessions to help balance patient safety, access and diagnostic innovation, the new rule may well face significant legal challenges in court, say Dominick DiSabatino and Audrey Mercer at Sheppard Mullin.

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