Technology

  • February 26, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware's Court of Chancery dropped two potentially far-reaching decisions last week: one about founder control at Moelis & Co. and another about TripAdvisor's planned move to Nevada. On top of that, there were new cases involving Citrix Systems, Alcoa Corp., BGC Partners Inc. and Cantor Fitzgerald LP.

  • February 26, 2024

    Lumen, AI Software Co. Settle $6M Trade Secrets Spat

    A Lumen Technologies subsidiary and a Texas-based AI company have settled a trade secrets lawsuit accusing Lumen of misappropriating the company's proprietary software and stiffing it on payments after ending their licensing agreement, according to a notice of settlement filed in Colorado federal court Friday.

  • February 26, 2024

    1st Circ. Rejects Crypto Founder's Hollow Fraud Appeal

    A cryptocurrency founder convicted of fraud hitched his appeal to "inapplicable precedent" and failed to muster an argument why a judge's blocking of testimony from government witnesses deprived his defense of material and favorable evidence, the First Circuit said in upholding the guilty verdict.

  • February 26, 2024

    KKR Buying Former VMware Unit From Broadcom In $4B Deal

    Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP-advised KKR said Monday it has agreed to acquire Broadcom Inc.'s end-user computing division in a transaction valued at approximately $4 billion, with Wachtell Lipton Rosen & Katz and O'Melveny & Myers LLP representing Broadcom on the deal. 

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Push To Unseal IBM Age Bias Award

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to review a Second Circuit decision barring a former IBM employee from publicizing her arbitration win on age bias claims, despite her assertion that the appeals court improperly valued confidentiality over public access to court documents.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    'Copy-And-Paste Errors' Not Worth Sanctions, Texas Judge Says

    A federal magistrate judge in Waco, Texas, says he doesn't think "some copy-and-paste errors" are enough to hook a prolific litigator of patent lawsuits to paying legal fees in a shell company's latest failed campaign against Salesforce.

  • February 23, 2024

    Grocery Delivery Co. Weee Escapes Data Breach Suit

    A New York federal judge has tossed a proposed class action against online grocery-delivery company Weee Inc. over a data breach without leave to amend, saying the plaintiffs failed to show a risk of injury since the leak only concerned low-risk data and not information such as payment records or passwords.

  • February 23, 2024

    Netflix, Hulu Don't Owe Franchise Fees, Calif. Panel Rules

    Netflix and Hulu have again beaten a proposed class action from a California city claiming the streaming providers should be regulated like cable companies and pay franchise fees to localities, with a state appeals court ruling the city had no right to private action under a 2006 statute.

  • February 23, 2024

    FCC To Again Start Collecting Broadcast Workforce Data

    The Federal Communications Commission has voted on party lines to start collecting workforce diversity data from the broadcast industry after a more than two-decade hiatus.

  • February 23, 2024

    Google Says Innovation Led To Dominance In Closing Brief

    Google is telling the D.C. federal judge overseeing the U.S. Department of Justice's monopoly case against the search giant that its innovation and relentlessness are the forces driving its dominance in search, not anticompetitive agreements as the Justice Department has alleged.

  • February 23, 2024

    GameStop Can't Ditch Suit Over Data Sharing With Facebook

    A California federal judge has refused to shut down a putative class action accusing GameStop Inc. of unlawfully sharing its customers' personal information with Facebook, ruling that the video game retailer qualified as a "video tape service provider" covered by federal privacy law. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Trims Bulk Of Investor Suit Against Oil, AI Companies

    A California federal judge retained only a small part of an investor suit against artificial intelligence company C3.ai and oil company Baker Hughes, cutting Baker Hughes entirely, and finding only some claims accusing C3.ai and its executives of misleading investors about its financial performance and partnership with the oil company could survive dismissal.

  • February 23, 2024

    A Comma Causes Netflix's Patent Challenge To Flop

    The majority of a board of patent judges has refused to budge on a determination upholding a streaming media patent challenged by Netflix, though the judges on the panel splintered at length on the grammatical implications of how to correctly read a comma.

  • February 23, 2024

    Seattle Hospital Gets Facebook Browser Tracking Suit Tossed

    A Washington state judge sided with Seattle Children's Hospital on Friday, throwing out a proposed class action accusing the healthcare provider of privacy law violations and agreeing the group of parents hadn't shown how the use of a browser tracking tool on its website disclosed confidential patient information to Facebook.

  • February 23, 2024

    Meta Unlikely To Beat Most Of BIPA Suit Over Voiceprints

    A California federal judge on Friday said she's inclined to deny the bulk of Meta Platforms Inc.'s request to dismiss a proposed biometric privacy class action claiming the social media company collects and stores customer voiceprints through its Facebook and Messenger platforms in violation of Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act.

  • February 23, 2024

    Crypto Org, Bitcoin Miner Sue DOE Over Electricity Survey

    A Texas cryptocurrency industry association and a crypto-mining company have sued the U.S. Department of Energy in an attempt to block its plans to solicit mining companies' information about electricity consumption, alleging the department shirked the proper statutory process to collect the data.

  • February 23, 2024

    Dish, IFit Settle Patent Suit Over Streaming Tech

    Fitness equipment maker NordicTrack's parent company has settled a dispute with Dish Network that accused it of infringing Dish patents related to streaming technology, drawing to a close a fight that spread all the way to the U.S. International Trade Commission.

  • February 23, 2024

    Chamber's Report Bemoans Biden's March-In Idea For Drug IP

    The most powerful business lobbying group in the U.S. said that although the country ranked at the top of its annual International IP Index, the Biden administration's efforts to potentially use patent laws to reduce the price of pharmaceuticals would jeopardize its place down the line.

  • February 23, 2024

    Social Media Addiction Fight Akin To Big Tobacco, Judge Says

    A California federal judge appeared skeptical Friday of dismissing claims by parents and children seeking to hold Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg liable in sprawling personal injury multidistrict litigation over social media's allegedly addictive design, comparing the addiction allegations to Big Tobacco cases that proceeded past the pleading stage.

  • February 23, 2024

    Telecom Giants Can't End Decadelong 4G LTE Patent Row

    A group of prominent telecommunications companies has failed to escape a patent dispute dating back a decade with the University of Minnesota concerning wireless communications technology used in 4G LTE network services.

  • February 23, 2024

    Commerce Dept. Partly Waives 'Buy America' For BEAD

    The U.S. Department of Commerce on Friday announced limited waivers from "Buy America" requirements under the agency's $42.5 billion broadband deployment program to make sure that enough advanced components can flow to projects around the country.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Won't Reschedule Google's Ad Tech Trial In Va.

    A Virginia federal judge refused a request from Google on Friday to reschedule a slated September trial for the U.S. Department of Justice's ad tech monopolization case, saying the tech giant can overcome a potential timing conflict for its attorneys.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Citrix Chief Hit With Class Action Over $16.5B Sale

    A proposed class of former Citrix Systems Inc. stockholders accused the company's former CEO and chairman Robert M. Calderoni of failing to get enough for stockholders for the $16.5 billion sale of the cloud software company to Vista Equity Partners Management LLC and Elliott Investment Management LP affiliate Evergreen Coast Capital Corp.

  • February 23, 2024

    Fla. Doctor Says T-Mobile Let Hacker Steal Her SIM Card

    A Tampa, Florida, doctor has sued T-Mobile for allegedly failing to stop a "SIM swap" hacker from transferring her personal phone account and then doing little to address the identity theft that followed, which involved the hacker trying to steal thousands from her retirement account and using her medical credentials to write more than 700 fraudulent prescriptions.

Expert Analysis

  • Using Arbitration And Class Waivers As Privacy Suit Tools

    Author Photo

    Amid a surge in data breach class actions over the last few years, several federal court decisions indicate that arbitration clauses and class action waiver provisions can be possible alternatives to public court battles and potentially reduce the costs of privacy litigation, say Mark Olthoff and Courtney Klaus at Polsinelli.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

    Author Photo

    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

    Author Photo

    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • Google Patent Case Is A Claim Construction Litigation Lesson

    Author Photo

    The Federal Circuit's recent precedential decision in Google v. EcoFactor, which held that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board erred in the claim construction it had unknowingly adopted, shows that litigators should be alert to claim construction issues that masquerade as something else, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Understanding SEC's Focus Amid Lack Of Final AI Rules

    Author Photo

    Although the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's proposed rules to govern artificial intelligence are likely far from being finalized, understanding existing regulatory provisions that could address AI risks with respect to development, disclosure, compliance and data protection could help firms anticipate and avoid pitfalls, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What's On The Horizon In Attorney General Enforcement

    Author Photo

    A look at recent attorney general actions, especially in the areas of antitrust and artificial intelligence, can help inform businesses on what they should expect in terms of enforcement trends as 10 attorney general races play out in 2024, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

    Author Photo

    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Open Questions After Elastos Crypto Class Action Settlement

    Author Photo

    The recent settlement in Owen v. Elastos Foundation resolving a class action fight over whether Elastos was required to register an initial coin offering with U.S. regulators has raised several questions that may be of interest to lawyers litigating cryptocurrency-related cases, including whether a crypto token constitutes a security under U.S. law, says Bradley Simon at Schlam Stone.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

    Author Photo

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Del. Segway Dismissal Suggests Execs Not Liable For Biz Risk

    Author Photo

    While the debate continues within the Delaware Chancery Court over whether Caremark liability applies to matters of pure business risk, the court's recent rejection of Segway’s suit against the ex-president who oversaw financial difficulties suggests the court is uninterested in undermining the deference the business judgment rule grants corporate fiduciaries, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Navigating The FCC's Rules On AI-Generated Robocall Voices

    Author Photo

    The Federal Communications Commission's declaratory ruling issued last week extends the agency's regulatory reach under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act to calls that use artificial intelligence technology to generate voices, laying out a compliance roadmap, but not making AI-cloned voices in robocalls illegal per se, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Generative AI Raises IP, Data Protection And Contracts Issues

    Author Photo

    As the EU's recent agreement on the Artificial Intelligence Act has fueled businesses' interest in adopting generative AI tools, it is crucial to understand how these tools utilize material to generate output and what questions to ask in relation to intellectual property, data privacy and contracts, say lawyers at Deloitte Legal.

  • Exporters Should Approach Self-Disclosure With Caution

    Author Photo

    A January Bureau of Industry and Security memorandum created an abbreviated process for disclosing export control violations that lack aggravating factors, but deciding which disclosure method to utilize remains a complex strategic undertaking to which companies must give careful consideration, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Is Compulsory Copyright Licensing Needed For AI Tech?

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Copyright Office's inquiry into whether Congress should establish a compulsory licensing regime for artificial intelligence technologies that are trained on copyrighted works has received relatively little attention — but commenters recently opposed the regime under three key themes, say Michael Kientzle and Ryan White at Arnold & Porter.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!